How to Decorate an Imbolc Altar




Imbolc is a time to celebrate the coming of spring. Winter is half way over and it’s time to begin preparations for a new harvest season.

Brigid, the Celtic Goddess of fertility and healing, is celebrated at this sabbat. She is the daughter of Dagda, a God of the Tuatha de Dannan. She is said to have had 2 other sisters, both named Brigid, which makes her a Triple Goddess. She is known for her green mantle or cloak.

Cloak Lore: Brigid was the daughter of a Pictish cheiftan who went to Ireland to learn from St. Patrick. While there, she petitioned the King of Leinster for land so that she could build her own abbey. The king agreed that he would give her as much land as her cloak could cover. Of course, her cloak grew and grew until is covered as much land as she needed for the abbey.

If you place a piece of cloth on your hearth at Imbolc, it is said that Brigid will come to bless it. If you continue to use the same cloth, it will grow stronger each year as Brigid blesses it again and again. You can then use this powerful cloth for healing and protection. Typically this cloth would be green to represent her cloak.

Items to place on your altar for decorate for Imbolc

Start out with a green cloth to represent Brigid’s cloak. Green is also a symbol of abundance. Not only financial abundance, but abundance of harvest.

Add some candles. I like to use spring colored candles. When looking around for some new candles, I ran across these floral candles, which would be perfect for an Imbolc altar. Off course, with new candles, you need new candle holders, if you don’t have any spares lying around.

A statue of Brigid, or something to represent her, like Brigid’s Cross. You can also create your own cross with some sticks and string.

Flowers. As Imbolc is celebrating that spring is coming, nothing is more fitting than some flowers. If you have access to fresh flowers, add what ever you can find. If you don’t want to splurge on flowers, I love these garlands, which can last for years to come and even work for other sabbat altars.

The end result is an altar that symbolizes the fertility of the land to bring a new harvest to support the growth of the planet for another year. 




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